Flying overseas for a teaching English abroad job.
TEFL/TESOL Travel

7 TEFL/TESOL essential tips for flying overseas.

The following article contains 7 TEFL/TESOL essential tips for flying overseas. These tips will help make your journey run smoother – whether you are making the trip abroad for a teaching English position, or just for a getaway break.

  1. Buy health and travel insurance before you set off.

This should really be a no-brainer, but you would be surprised by just how many people head off abroad without comprehensive health and travel insurance. Some banks offer insurance when you take out a bank card with them, so this might also be worth checking out.

Due to the current complications within the airline industry, caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we strongly recommend buying travel insurance that covers cancelled flights. If you take a look at https://www.airlinequality.com, you can read the many angry complaints from customers who have had their flights cancelled last minute. A significant number of flyers have complained about not being able to get through to an airline’s customer support, complained about being offered vouchers instead of a cash refund, and complained that their flight was cancelled a few days before their scheduled date of departure. A good travel insurance policy should cover you if you find yourself in a similar situation.

The best seats on an aeroplane.
2. Do something nice for your future self and choose a great seat.

When you have paid for your flight, you are then usually directed to choose your seat.

We recommend checking which type of plane you will be flying on, and then going to https://www.seatguru.com to take a look at which seats are recommended for your flight – and which seats are best avoided. As a general rule, the most uncomfortable seats on a plane are the ones located next to the toilets, middle seats, and the seats in the last row of the aircraft.

A lot of people prefer being located over the wing as this makes for a smoother ride. Sitting at the back of the plane will mean experiencing more turbulence. However, in the (extremely unlikely) event of an unplanned landing at high speed, the back of the plane is statistically where you will have the greater chance of surviving.

3. Prepare yourself for the highly improbable.

According to 2015 statistics from The Economist, the probability of your plane going down is around one in 5.4 million. In fact, air travel is (by far) the safest form of transport around. It is, however, prudent (and polite) to pay attention to the pre-flight safety demonstration. And it is also wise to take a read through the aircraft safety card.

When a plane disaster does happen, it is the passengers who paid attention to the safety instructions that are more likely to survive. Examples of completely avoidable deaths when a plane did run into problems were passengers inflating their life vests inside of the plane, and passengers who couldn’t work out how to unbuckle the seat belt – both examples having been explained in the pre-flight safety instructions.

Another good tip regarding safety on board, is to count the rows of seats from the nearest exit as you make your way up the aeroplane aisle. This way, you will be able to make your way safely out of the plane in that rare event of a total blackout on board.

And lastly, until it won’t be necessary anymore, please wear a face mask on board your flight. Yes, it’s uncomfortable. Yes, it makes you feel hot during the flight. But, you will be protecting yourself and the passengers/flight attendants around you.

4. Don’t get juiced up on alcoholic drinks.

Because a lot of people are nervous flyers, they tend to rely on alcohol to calm themselves when flying.

If you do need to drink, we recommend just having the one. Well, perhaps two is also fine 🙂 One thing you really don’t want to do though is to drink more than two, because then you will arrive at your destination feeling pretty dreadful.

There is a saying that ‘one drink in the air is two on the ground’ – meaning that you’ll experience an alcohol double-whammy when you have a drink on the plane. Flying at high altitudes also dehydrates the body, so alcohol is really best avoided completely.

Our advise for any nervous flyers out there, is to contact your doctor and ask them for a one-time prescription of valium. Taking one valium tablet before your light will help with the flying nerves and you won’t feel so terrible when you have arrived at your destination.

But, never mix the medication with alcohol!

5. Be nice to the flight attendants.

A lot of people seem to quite naturally assume that flight attendants live the glamorous life of international travel, 5-star hotels, and high salaries.

The reality, however, is that the job of a flight attendant is more often than not excessively demanding. The salaries are relatively low, there is often very little time for sleep once the plane has landed and a long journey home has been spent pondering a next-day early morning departure, and some flyers can be less than pleasant. On top of all this, flight attendants are expected to look their best at all times on board, and are expected to be alert and approachable throughout the flight.

When you first board your plane, we recommend giving the flight attendants a friendly smile and saying ‘hello’ to them. Continue this respectful behaviour on board and you will find that they will be much more ready to help you out with any questions or requests that you might have during the flight. And besides, it feels good to make someone else feel good too 🙂

6. Mid-flight theft is a thing.

A lot of people board the plane, place their belongings in the overhead compartment (the bag or case which was too valuable to place in the hold) and then promptly forget about it until the plane arrives at their destination.

In an ideal world, this is perfectly acceptable behaviour.

Unfortunately, this isn’t an ideal world.

Some individuals take flights for the specific purpose of stealing valuables from unsuspecting travellers.

Our advice, is to keep your money and passport stashed inside a money belt – concealed under your clothing. If your carry-on luggage isn’t too cumbersome then store it under the seat in front of you. If it has zippers, consider buying a combination lock so that you can sleep with the knowledge that no stray hands will be able to open it while you are sleeping to the white noise of the plane’s engines.

If you have to place your carry-on in the overhead lockers, make sure that you are aware of exactly where it is – flight attendants sometimes move overhead cabin luggage before takeoff, in order to better organise space.

Either way, don’t assume that all of your fellow passengers are making the journey with you purely for transport reasons.

7. Fill out the arrivals card before your plane lands.

Towards the end of long-haul flights, it is often the case that you will be given an arrivals card to complete before you can pass though immigration.

Towards the end of long-haul flights, people are often tired and put off completing the card until they have reached passport control. This is when they realise that they don’t have a pen, there isn’t a pen in sight, and they probably don’t have their flight ticket stub either and so can’t remember their flight number.

To avoid this unnecessary stress, we recommend completing the arrivals card while you are still on the plane. If you don’t have a pen, you can always ask the flight attendant whom you have been polite to throughout the flight and they will likely find a pen for you.

With your arrivals card complete, you can safely stash your passport back under your clothes and walk off the plane prepared to join the immigration queue – all your documents at the ready.

Bon voyage! 🙂

I hope that you enjoyed these 7 TEFL/TESOL essential tips for flying overseas!

If you have any questions about this article, please feel free to contact us.

Sarah Pearson
Travel Advisor
info@teflonlinepro.com
https://teflonlinepro.com/
https://www.facebook.com/pg/teflonlinepro/reviews/
Teachers' Choice Award winner, 2019 | 2020

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Teach.

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As an English speaker, born into one of the de facto native English nations (Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, United Kingdom, United States of America) there are very few barriers for you to freely teaching English around the planet, in the global locations where English tuition is sought after in high demand – which is pretty much anywhere in the world, with the exception of Antarctica.

But let’s all leave the Earth’s southernmost continent alone, even if a burgeoning TEFL industry were to be one day considered there too.

Such is the international demand for learning the English language, that non-native English speakers also experience little difficulty in securing English teaching positions overseas – as long as their English language level is at C1 or C2 semi-fluency/fluency level.

Of course, the native English speakers will have the pick of the jobs first, but there are so many opportunities that our non-native English speaking graduates also successfully interview for teaching English jobs worldwide.

Many people choose to teach English overseas as a Gap year, some choose it as a way of taking a few years “off” while they go explore the world, and there is a growing trend for Baby boomers, and people born into the Silent Generation and Generation X, to use their TEFL/TESOL credentials in order to be able to live overseas; often teaching under tamarind-tree shaded sunlight and spending a portion of their disposable income on coconut oil massages and coconut water health drinks.

And then, of course, there are the migrating humans, that spend the summer months back home and who then fly to a much warmer part of the world to teach English when the first flakes of winter snow arrive.

It isn’t all champagne and caviar though.

Teaching English can be an incredibly demanding job.

Students often have the superpower of zapping energy from you like crystalline Kryptonite. Your days might be long. You might nurture dark thoughts towards particular students, and one or two will inevitably be mirroring your exact same excursions of the mind.

But, overall, you will – in the vast majority of cases – complete that class semester that occasionally drove you nuts, and you will miss those moments in your life when you found yourself reaching out to other human beings and sharing your knowledge; to people whose future quality of life, very likely, partly depended on their attendance at your English classes.

So yes, as with any job there are pros and cons.

But regarding teaching English, who else do you know who can honestly state that they work a 4-day week and are then able to spend a long weekend off on an exotic island, such as (for example) Koh Rong in southern Cambodia?

If you are reading this and suddenly feel that ‘itchy feet’ syndrome of wanting to get the hell out of where you are living and traveling the world, you can! 🙂

Or, if you would like to stay put for a while and earn money teaching English online, we have now also become experts in the field of helping to connect tefl online pro graduates with high-paying online teaching employment, through our meticulous researching of online language schools.

Teach. Earn. Travel.

Click on the link below to find out more about escaping the rat race.

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No matter where you decide to teach English, you can be rest assured that you will always be guaranteed to earn an above average local salary.

In life, everything tends to be relative.

Please allow us to use the Big Mac Index as a variable of this relativity, to compare two teaching English locations: Switzerland and the Czech Republic.

In Switzerland, you can earn between US$30 to US$60 per hour teaching English. The average price of a Big Mac in Switzerland, according to the 2020 Big Mac Index, is US$6.71.

In the Czech Republic (Czechia) most teachers start off on a US$15 to US$20 hourly rate, although some diligent teachers, who hit the ground running at Vaclav Havel International Airport, have been known to earn up to US$50 per hour. But in realistic terms, starting out as an English teacher in the Czech Republic, the US$15 to US$20 hourly rate is a more helpful indicator for you. The average price of a Big Mac in the Czech Republic, according to the 2020 Big Mac Index, is US$3.76.

At this stage of the article, we want to sincerely apologize to our vegan and vegetarian customers and graduates. We decided to us the Big Mac Index simply because it’s just so useful in the measurement of purchasing power parity.

Explained in basic economics, if you choose to teach English in an expensive country, you will earn a higher salary and incur higher daily costs. If, however, you choose to teach English in an inexpensive country, you will earn a lower salary and incur lower daily costs.

We have tefl online pro graduates, for example, teaching English in Prague. They tend to work the same amount of hours per month. Most of them get by on a hedonistic lifestyle that some Czechs could only dream of aspiring. These teachers tend to spend their disposable income on lots of “me time” 🙂 And why not? It’s an amazing city and there are lots of bars, restaurants, theatre performances, etc., to spend money on. Some teachers, however, are much more prudent with their salaries and use their saved income to travel to warmer destinations in the winter holidays and for backpacking adventures in the long summer holiday months. And some teachers religiously save whatever they earn, to help pay off their student loan, and to have money in the bank when they either return back home or head off on their next teaching English abroad adventure.

The alternative, of course, is to teach English (from home) online. Hourly wages vary tremendously, but tefl online pro has an excellent network of online language schools that pay between US$20 and US$35 per hour. Not so bad, considering you save money on transport and time and you have that precious, sought after, ideal lifestyle of making money online.

So wherever (or however) you choose to teach English, your ability to save money won’t necessarily depend on how much you earn. We have examples of tefl online pro graduates who have gone off to South Korea to teach, and who have then returned home and been able to afford to put down a deposit on a mortgage. We also have graduates who choose not to save at all. And then there are the graduates that combine the two, by leading an active social life and still managing to put aside a sizable chunk of their earnings each month.

TeachEarnTravel.

Click on the link below to find out more about TEFL jobs and TEFL salaries.

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