Flying overseas for a teaching English abroad job.
TEFL/TESOL Travel

7 TEFL/TESOL essential tips for flying overseas.

The following article contains 7 TEFL/TESOL essential tips for flying overseas. These tips will help make your journey run smoother – whether you are making the trip abroad for a teaching English position, or just for a getaway break.

  1. Buy health and travel insurance before you set off.

This should really be a no-brainer, but you would be surprised by just how many people head off abroad without comprehensive health and travel insurance. Some banks offer insurance when you take out a bank card with them, so this might also be worth checking out.

Due to the current complications within the airline industry, caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we strongly recommend buying travel insurance that covers cancelled flights. If you take a look at https://www.airlinequality.com, you can read the many angry complaints from customers who have had their flights cancelled last minute. A significant number of flyers have complained about not being able to get through to an airline’s customer support, complained about being offered vouchers instead of a cash refund, and complained that their flight was cancelled a few days before their scheduled date of departure. A good travel insurance policy should cover you if you find yourself in a similar situation.

The best seats on an aeroplane.
2. Do something nice for your future self and choose a great seat.

When you have paid for your flight, you are then usually directed to choose your seat.

We recommend checking which type of plane you will be flying on, and then going to https://www.seatguru.com to take a look at which seats are recommended for your flight – and which seats are best avoided. As a general rule, the most uncomfortable seats on a plane are the ones located next to the toilets, middle seats, and the seats in the last row of the aircraft.

A lot of people prefer being located over the wing as this makes for a smoother ride. Sitting at the back of the plane will mean experiencing more turbulence. However, in the (extremely unlikely) event of an unplanned landing at high speed, the back of the plane is statistically where you will have the greater chance of surviving.

3. Prepare yourself for the highly improbable.

According to 2015 statistics from The Economist, the probability of your plane going down is around one in 5.4 million. In fact, air travel is (by far) the safest form of transport around. It is, however, prudent (and polite) to pay attention to the pre-flight safety demonstration. And it is also wise to take a read through the aircraft safety card.

When a plane disaster does happen, it is the passengers who paid attention to the safety instructions that are more likely to survive. Examples of completely avoidable deaths when a plane did run into problems were passengers inflating their life vests inside of the plane, and passengers who couldn’t work out how to unbuckle the seat belt – both examples having been explained in the pre-flight safety instructions.

Another good tip regarding safety on board, is to count the rows of seats from the nearest exit as you make your way up the aeroplane aisle. This way, you will be able to make your way safely out of the plane in that rare event of a total blackout on board.

And lastly, until it won’t be necessary anymore, please wear a face mask on board your flight. Yes, it’s uncomfortable. Yes, it makes you feel hot during the flight. But, you will be protecting yourself and the passengers/flight attendants around you.

4. Don’t get juiced up on alcoholic drinks.

Because a lot of people are nervous flyers, they tend to rely on alcohol to calm themselves when flying.

If you do need to drink, we recommend just having the one. Well, perhaps two is also fine 🙂 One thing you really don’t want to do though is to drink more than two, because then you will arrive at your destination feeling pretty dreadful.

There is a saying that ‘one drink in the air is two on the ground’ – meaning that you’ll experience an alcohol double-whammy when you have a drink on the plane. Flying at high altitudes also dehydrates the body, so alcohol is really best avoided completely.

Our advise for any nervous flyers out there, is to contact your doctor and ask them for a one-time prescription of valium. Taking one valium tablet before your light will help with the flying nerves and you won’t feel so terrible when you have arrived at your destination.

But, never mix the medication with alcohol!

5. Be nice to the flight attendants.

A lot of people seem to quite naturally assume that flight attendants live the glamorous life of international travel, 5-star hotels, and high salaries.

The reality, however, is that the job of a flight attendant is more often than not excessively demanding. The salaries are relatively low, there is often very little time for sleep once the plane has landed and a long journey home has been spent pondering a next-day early morning departure, and some flyers can be less than pleasant. On top of all this, flight attendants are expected to look their best at all times on board, and are expected to be alert and approachable throughout the flight.

When you first board your plane, we recommend giving the flight attendants a friendly smile and saying ‘hello’ to them. Continue this respectful behaviour on board and you will find that they will be much more ready to help you out with any questions or requests that you might have during the flight. And besides, it feels good to make someone else feel good too 🙂

6. Mid-flight theft is a thing.

A lot of people board the plane, place their belongings in the overhead compartment (the bag or case which was too valuable to place in the hold) and then promptly forget about it until the plane arrives at their destination.

In an ideal world, this is perfectly acceptable behaviour.

Unfortunately, this isn’t an ideal world.

Some individuals take flights for the specific purpose of stealing valuables from unsuspecting travellers.

Our advice, is to keep your money and passport stashed inside a money belt – concealed under your clothing. If your carry-on luggage isn’t too cumbersome then store it under the seat in front of you. If it has zippers, consider buying a combination lock so that you can sleep with the knowledge that no stray hands will be able to open it while you are sleeping to the white noise of the plane’s engines.

If you have to place your carry-on in the overhead lockers, make sure that you are aware of exactly where it is – flight attendants sometimes move overhead cabin luggage before takeoff, in order to better organise space.

Either way, don’t assume that all of your fellow passengers are making the journey with you purely for transport reasons.

7. Fill out the arrivals card before your plane lands.

Towards the end of long-haul flights, it is often the case that you will be given an arrivals card to complete before you can pass though immigration.

Towards the end of long-haul flights, people are often tired and put off completing the card until they have reached passport control. This is when they realise that they don’t have a pen, there isn’t a pen in sight, and they probably don’t have their flight ticket stub either and so can’t remember their flight number.

To avoid this unnecessary stress, we recommend completing the arrivals card while you are still on the plane. If you don’t have a pen, you can always ask the flight attendant whom you have been polite to throughout the flight and they will likely find a pen for you.

With your arrivals card complete, you can safely stash your passport back under your clothes and walk off the plane prepared to join the immigration queue – all your documents at the ready.

Bon voyage! 🙂

I hope that you enjoyed these 7 TEFL/TESOL essential tips for flying overseas!

If you have any questions about this article, please feel free to contact us.

Sarah Pearson
Travel Advisor
info@teflonlinepro.com
https://teflonlinepro.com/
https://www.facebook.com/pg/teflonlinepro/reviews/
Teachers' Choice Award winner, 2019 | 2020

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Travel.

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Jim Morrison, the iconic American Rock singer, wrote in the song, ‘The Soft Parade’ (whilst his insatiable libido presumably partook in a temporary sabbatical) that, “There’s only four ways to get unraveled. One is to sleep and the other is travel…”.

There can be no doubt that travel broadens the mind. Travel opens doors, removes window blinds, and allows you a glimpse of how other people lead their lives in different parts of the world.

And when you do have the opportunity to travel, which, btw, is only a recent phenomenon that our generation is the lucky lottery winner beneficiary of, you begin to understand that all of us share the same concerns, the same anxieties, the same needs, the same (or at least similar) dreams and hopes.

Unless you are a member of the One Percent club reading this, that owns and controls 34.4% of all net worth in the United States, you will be surprised at just how many things you have in common with people that you meet with around the world.

And teaching English is an incredible eye opener in terms of meeting students from all walks of life, and sharing your life experiences together.

We want to share with you five tips for traveling that have evolved for us over the years, when it comes to improving your quality of travel experience.

  1. Pack light. Unless you are on an expedition to climb the peak of Mount Everest, you really don’t need to take that 100 liter backpack. I always travel with a 30 Liter backpack. It has side pockets, zippy things that you can zip or click things onto, and, most importantly, I don’t need to leave it in a coach hold and hope it’s there when I reach my destination. Plus, of course, it’s light. Try and find one with a rain sheet attached because then you have an added layer of security from unwanted thieves, by stretching it over your pack and hiding the entry points of your backpack.
  2. Sign up with an Air Miles club. It’s unlikely that you will only take one flight in your life and when you rack up a significant number of air miles, you can then upgrade for that Business Class seat that you sometimes casually ask for an upgrade to in the Economy passenger line, but are inevitably always denied.
  3. Go with your gut. My experience of travel is that most people are decent, hard-working folk. But there are a few bad apples out there. The eyes, whether kind-looking or hateful, usually give a person’s personality and intentions away. Never accept gifts from strangers (drinks, food, etc.) and if you do find yourself in a situation where your gut instinct is telling you to get the hell out of there, get the hell out of there.
  4. Respect the local culture and familiarize yourself with local laws. In Thailand, for example, it’s the height of bad manners to touch people on the head. It’s also a faux pas to point your feet in another person’s direction. And if you find yourself at the Koh Phangan Full Moon Party and a stranger comes up to you with an offer of a substance which is now legal throughout Canada, don’t accept it. Before you head off to your chosen destination, please watch the National Geographic Video, ‘Locked Up Abroad‘ season. In the UK, they call it, ‘Banged Up Abroad’.
  5. Enjoy! Enjoy the different aromas, cuisines, cultures, people. Be open to new (good-gut-feeling) experiences. It’s your world too, so go explore it!

TeachEarnTravel.

Click on the link below to read about the most popular teaching English destinations.

Teaching English destinations


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