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Earn.

tefl online pro. Earn.


No matter where you decide to teach English, you can be rest assured that you will always be guaranteed to earn an above average local salary.

In life, everything tends to be relative.

Please allow us to use the Big Mac Index as a variable of this relativity, to compare two teaching English locations: Switzerland and the Czech Republic.

In Switzerland, you can earn between US$30 to US$60 per hour teaching English. The average price of a Big Mac in Switzerland, according to the 2020 Big Mac Index, is US$6.71.

In the Czech Republic (Czechia) most teachers start off on a US$15 to US$20 hourly rate, although some diligent teachers, who hit the ground running at Vaclav Havel International Airport, have been known to earn up to US$50 per hour. But in realistic terms, starting out as an English teacher in the Czech Republic, the US$15 to US$20 hourly rate is a more helpful indicator for you. The average price of a Big Mac in the Czech Republic, according to the 2020 Big Mac Index, is US$3.76.

At this stage of the article, we want to sincerely apologize to our vegan and vegetarian customers and graduates. We decided to us the Big Mac Index simply because it’s just so useful in the measurement of purchasing power parity.

Explained in basic economics, if you choose to teach English in an expensive country, you will earn a higher salary and incur higher daily costs. If, however, you choose to teach English in an inexpensive country, you will earn a lower salary and incur lower daily costs.

We have tefl online pro graduates, for example, teaching English in Prague. They tend to work the same amount of hours per month. Most of them get by on a hedonistic lifestyle that some Czechs could only dream of aspiring. These teachers tend to spend their disposable income on lots of “me time” 🙂 And why not? It’s an amazing city and there are lots of bars, restaurants, theatre performances, etc., to spend money on. Some teachers, however, are much more prudent with their salaries and use their saved income to travel to warmer destinations in the winter holidays and for backpacking adventures in the long summer holiday months. And some teachers religiously save whatever they earn, to help pay off their student loan, and to have money in the bank when they either return back home or head off on their next teaching English abroad adventure.

The alternative, of course, is to teach English (from home) online. Hourly wages vary tremendously, but tefl online pro has an excellent network of online language schools that pay between US$20 and US$35 per hour. Not so bad, considering you save money on transport and time and you have that precious, sought after, ideal lifestyle of making money online.

So wherever (or however) you choose to teach English, your ability to save money won’t necessarily depend on how much you earn. We have examples of tefl online pro graduates who have gone off to South Korea to teach, and who have then returned home and been able to afford to put down a deposit on a mortgage. We also have graduates who choose not to save at all. And then there are the graduates that combine the two, by leading an active social life and still managing to put aside a sizable chunk of their earnings each month.

TeachEarnTravel.

Click on the link below to find out more about TEFL jobs and TEFL salaries.

TEFL Jobs


teflonlinepro.com – International TEFL TESOL Online and Combined Certification Courses with Lifetime Job Support.


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tefl online pro reviews

Travel.

tefl online pro. Travel.


Jim Morrison, the iconic American Rock singer, wrote in the song, ‘The Soft Parade’ (whilst his insatiable libido presumably partook in a temporary sabbatical) that, “There’s only four ways to get unraveled. One is to sleep and the other is travel…”.

There can be no doubt that travel broadens the mind. Travel opens doors, removes window blinds, and allows you a glimpse of how other people lead their lives in different parts of the world.

And when you do have the opportunity to travel, which, btw, is only a recent phenomenon that our generation is the lucky lottery winner beneficiary of, you begin to understand that all of us share the same concerns, the same anxieties, the same needs, the same (or at least similar) dreams and hopes.

Unless you are a member of the One Percent club reading this, that owns and controls 34.4% of all net worth in the United States, you will be surprised at just how many things you have in common with people that you meet with around the world.

And teaching English is an incredible eye opener in terms of meeting students from all walks of life, and sharing your life experiences together.

We want to share with you five tips for traveling that have evolved for us over the years, when it comes to improving your quality of travel experience.

  1. Pack light. Unless you are on an expedition to climb the peak of Mount Everest, you really don’t need to take that 100 liter backpack. I always travel with a 30 Liter backpack. It has side pockets, zippy things that you can zip or click things onto, and, most importantly, I don’t need to leave it in a coach hold and hope it’s there when I reach my destination. Plus, of course, it’s light. Try and find one with a rain sheet attached because then you have an added layer of security from unwanted thieves, by stretching it over your pack and hiding the entry points of your backpack.
  2. Sign up with an Air Miles club. It’s unlikely that you will only take one flight in your life and when you rack up a significant number of air miles, you can then upgrade for that Business Class seat that you sometimes casually ask for an upgrade to in the Economy passenger line, but are inevitably always denied.
  3. Go with your gut. My experience of travel is that most people are decent, hard-working folk. But there are a few bad apples out there. The eyes, whether kind-looking or hateful, usually give a person’s personality and intentions away. Never accept gifts from strangers (drinks, food, etc.) and if you do find yourself in a situation where your gut instinct is telling you to get the hell out of there, get the hell out of there.
  4. Respect the local culture and familiarize yourself with local laws. In Thailand, for example, it’s the height of bad manners to touch people on the head. It’s also a faux pas to point your feet in another person’s direction. And if you find yourself at the Koh Phangan Full Moon Party and a stranger comes up to you with an offer of a substance which is now legal throughout Canada, don’t accept it. Before you head off to your chosen destination, please watch the National Geographic Video, ‘Locked Up Abroad‘ season. In the UK, they call it, ‘Banged Up Abroad’.
  5. Enjoy! Enjoy the different aromas, cuisines, cultures, people. Be open to new (good-gut-feeling) experiences. It’s your world too, so go explore it!

TeachEarnTravel.

Click on the link below to read about the most popular teaching English destinations.

Teaching English destinations


teflonlinepro.com – International TEFL TESOL Online and Combined Certification Courses with Lifetime Job Support.